Does Your Bugout Mobile Have These 3 Critical Vehicle Survival Gear Items?

Jeff Anderson

Have you ever seen the movie “Dante’s Peak?”

It’s a pretty good flick starring a Suburban.

No, I’m not kidding — Pierce Brosnan might be in the movie, but the star of that film is his Suburban 4WD, which saves his life over and over again as he contends with everything from flooded rivers to an erupting volcano.

A flood is probably more likely than a volcano, but a few of us are old enough to remember when Mount St. Helens erupted and dumped a ton of volcanic ash on the area, creating a massive state of emergency.

I recently talked with expert survivalist and trainer, Tony Nester, about what is the best survival gear for your bugout mobile and here are some tips based on what he packs away…

3 Critical Items Of Emergency Survival Gear
For Your Bug-Out Mobile

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Tony NesterAre you prepared with the best survival gear to face a crisis?

Oh sure… you have your bugout bag ready to go – but making sure your vehicle has the proper equipment can greatly expand your preparedness far beyond your bugout bag and help you deal with emergencies that last at least a few days, or even longer.

In fact, no matter what the natural disaster or other emergency, when it comes to bugging out, you need to think of your vehicle as a kind of “rolling survival kit”.

Here are 3 critical items to pack in your “bugout mobile” that will make you far better prepared…

Tarps And Space Blankets For Fuel Efficiency

One thing you absolutely must have is something like a space blanket or emergency blanket.

There’s a product called Heat Sheet that is a little more durable than the typical emergency blanket.

You should also have a tarp.

The tarp isn’t something you’re going to wrap up in to stay warm on the highway.  It’s for when you’re out in the cold, or you’re stuck in the snow, and you’ve got to take shelter in your vehicle.

You can use that tarp or those space blankets together with some duct tape and seal off the unused portions of your vehicle behind your front seat.

If you’re in an SUV or a van, you seal off the portion behind the two front seats, taping and tying things up, pinning them where necessary.

Then you unravel the heat sheet.

That will make your vehicle much more fuel efficient in that it concentrates the heat in one area, allowing you to survive a lot longer.

This is a remarkably field-expedient solution.

Quality, Calorie-Dense Food That Doesn't Require Cooking

Another thing you should have in your vehicle is quality food that requires no cooking or heating.

One thing that is great for wintertime is, believe it or not, shortbread cookies.

These are high in fat, high in calories, and taste pretty good.

Add in some peanut butter and you have something that will get you through a cold night, where you may be burning through a lot of calories to stoke your inner furnace.

Having quality fuel in your car that doesn’t have to be cooked, which you can get inside you quickly on a cold night, will really help.

A New Wick Candle

I don’t know if Eskimos still live in igloos these days, but a single candle can heat an entire igloo.

A simple candle can therefore make all the difference for cold-weather survival in your vehicle.

It can be used for melting snow, boiling water, and warming the interior of your vehicle.

You can crack a window open and use it for all those different purposes.

The average candle will last between 36 and 48 hours… and while you’re using it, you don’t have to burn fuel or even have your vehicle running.

Equip Yourself Now With The Best Vehicle Survival Gear… BEFORE You Need It!

It doesn’t take much to prepare yourself for better survival in your vehicle.

Whether you are bugging out or just stranded in bad weather, having a few simple items on hand can really help you.

You don’t necessarily have to fight a volcano single-handed, but you DO have to plan ahead for common emergencies and problems.

Get ready now and you may save your life, or the lives of your family members, when the rubber meets the road.

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