EMPShield.com Follow Up Questions

I have some follow up questions for Andrew Bucchin from EMPShield.com after the EMP Survival Warrior Workshop:

1. Would a USGI ammo can with rubber seal under the lid and cardboard lining inside need additional shielding to be effective against EMP related ionization energy, or would additional shielding (such as conductive tape around the seams) be needed?

2. If you had EMPShield equipment installed in your home, would small Uninterruptable Power Source device connected to household wiring compromise either home protection or any connected devices (i.e. daisy-chain effects)?

3. If your EMPShield equipped home experienced a lightning strike, would the device need to be replaced, or might it survive multiple strikes?

4. If the power company produced an overvoltage power surge in the home, would the EMPShield device prevent damage to plugged in household items?

5. Is there a limit on distance protected by whole home devices (i.e. if a yard building were fed from main panel to subpanel) or are there other circuit design issues - other than 3-phase - that must be accounted for?

6. Are there any tests that can be performed over time to ensure your installed EMPShield device is still functional?

7. If you have a vehicle installed/mounted CB or VHF/UHF (2 meter style) and/or HF radio rig with an even larger antenna attached, would your vehicle protection device extend to protect the installed HAM radio equipment, or would a separate radio protection device still be recommended?

8. If you have uninstalled EMF protection devices, is there a shelf-life to device effectiveness (i.e. If I store back-up devices inside faraday cage device (back to my ammo box example), any idea how long it would theoretically last in storage?

9. Should tape (including adhesive material itself) used to seal seams of a home-built Faraday box be conductive or non-conductive?

10. I generally understand how a whole home device would dissipate energy through the earth ground, but on vehicle mounted model, would you not need some type of dragging grounding strap? Would vehicle be protected while in operation from either EMP or lightning strike?

11. If you had an EMPShield device installed on both your home and a standby generator, would both devices add a cumulative effect to electrical circuit protection or would the rated protection be the same as for a single device. Am I correct in assuming that you would not have to remove one of the devices from the circuit?

12. Unrelated to EMPShield devices, but given your experience are there any wristwatch style time keeping devices (like Timex Indiglo as an example) that you've found to be susceptible to EMP energies?

13. I saw in some YouTube installation videos what appears to be an AGC-20 (20 amp Buss glass cartridge fuse) in the wiring lead to the EMPShield device. Must this be 20 amps, and is there any circumstance you could envision in which the fuse might be blown, but the device itself remain functional for EMP/lightning strike protection?

14. Is it a best practice installation technique to coil and zip-tie excess installation wiring?

15. If automotive battery were below 12 volts, would installed EMPShield device still provide needed protection?

16. I have a 2016 Ford with an embedded chip in a key that physically must be inserted in the ignition for the car to start. If an EMP happened while this vehicle were in motion (i.e. key not physically housed in a Faraday cage), would vehicle computer shut the car down (due to losing the "connection" with its' "authentic device" key)?

17. If you have an uninstalled EMPShield device stored outside of a Faraday cage, would it remain serviceable post-EMP event?

18. EMPShield home device properly installed. Household item plugged into wall, but device is turned off (example of an AM/FM radio or DVD player) would such a connected but non-energized device still be protected?

19. Would High saturation Ferrites clipped over the Line 1, Line 2, and shared neutral/ground input wires be advisable additions to a whole home installed EMPShield device, or would you consider them an unnecessary expense?

20. Would an in-ground tornado shelter (either metal walled insert into concrete or fiberglass constructed "tank" design) inherently offer more protection against EMP damages than being above ground?

21. Installing on tractor where battery position is problematic (almost 5 feet from firewall). Is there a limit on length of wire to battery connection from device, and what gauge/type wire is recommended for extensions?

22. Are ordinary LED light bulbs susceptible to EMP damages?

Thanks for a great workshop and for addressing as many of these follow-up questions as possible!

David W.

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  • #87418

    David W.
    Participant

    I have some follow up questions for Andrew Bucchin from EMPShield.com after the EMP Survival Warrior Workshop:

    1. Would a USGI ammo can with rubber seal under the lid and cardboard lining inside need additional shielding to be effective against EMP related ionization energy, or would additional shielding (such as conductive tape around the seams) be needed?

    2. If you had EMPShield equipment installed in your home, would small Uninterruptable Power Source device connected to household wiring compromise either home protection or any connected devices (i.e. daisy-chain effects)?

    3. If your EMPShield equipped home experienced a lightning strike, would the device need to be replaced, or might it survive multiple strikes?

    4. If the power company produced an overvoltage power surge in the home, would the EMPShield device prevent damage to plugged in household items?

    5. Is there a limit on distance protected by whole home devices (i.e. if a yard building were fed from main panel to subpanel) or are there other circuit design issues – other than 3-phase – that must be accounted for?

    6. Are there any tests that can be performed over time to ensure your installed EMPShield device is still functional?

    7. If you have a vehicle installed/mounted CB or VHF/UHF (2 meter style) and/or HF radio rig with an even larger antenna attached, would your vehicle protection device extend to protect the installed HAM radio equipment, or would a separate radio protection device still be recommended?

    8. If you have uninstalled EMF protection devices, is there a shelf-life to device effectiveness (i.e. If I store back-up devices inside faraday cage device (back to my ammo box example), any idea how long it would theoretically last in storage?

    9. Should tape (including adhesive material itself) used to seal seams of a home-built Faraday box be conductive or non-conductive?

    10. I generally understand how a whole home device would dissipate energy through the earth ground, but on vehicle mounted model, would you not need some type of dragging grounding strap? Would vehicle be protected while in operation from either EMP or lightning strike?

    11. If you had an EMPShield device installed on both your home and a standby generator, would both devices add a cumulative effect to electrical circuit protection or would the rated protection be the same as for a single device. Am I correct in assuming that you would not have to remove one of the devices from the circuit?

    12. Unrelated to EMPShield devices, but given your experience are there any wristwatch style time keeping devices (like Timex Indiglo as an example) that you’ve found to be susceptible to EMP energies?

    13. I saw in some YouTube installation videos what appears to be an AGC-20 (20 amp Buss glass cartridge fuse) in the wiring lead to the EMPShield device. Must this be 20 amps, and is there any circumstance you could envision in which the fuse might be blown, but the device itself remain functional for EMP/lightning strike protection?

    14. Is it a best practice installation technique to coil and zip-tie excess installation wiring?

    15. If automotive battery were below 12 volts, would installed EMPShield device still provide needed protection?

    16. I have a 2016 Ford with an embedded chip in a key that physically must be inserted in the ignition for the car to start. If an EMP happened while this vehicle were in motion (i.e. key not physically housed in a Faraday cage), would vehicle computer shut the car down (due to losing the “connection” with its’ “authentic device” key)?

    17. If you have an uninstalled EMPShield device stored outside of a Faraday cage, would it remain serviceable post-EMP event?

    18. EMPShield home device properly installed. Household item plugged into wall, but device is turned off (example of an AM/FM radio or DVD player) would such a connected but non-energized device still be protected?

    19. Would High saturation Ferrites clipped over the Line 1, Line 2, and shared neutral/ground input wires be advisable additions to a whole home installed EMPShield device, or would you consider them an unnecessary expense?

    20. Would an in-ground tornado shelter (either metal walled insert into concrete or fiberglass constructed “tank” design) inherently offer more protection against EMP damages than being above ground?

    21. Installing on tractor where battery position is problematic (almost 5 feet from firewall). Is there a limit on length of wire to battery connection from device, and what gauge/type wire is recommended for extensions?

    22. Are ordinary LED light bulbs susceptible to EMP damages?

    Thanks for a great workshop and for addressing as many of these follow-up questions as possible!

  • TJ
    Member

    17 Replies

    Survival Planning

     

    I was stuck in a work meeting and didn’t get a chance to attend the workshop live but am looking forward to watching it next week.

    I’m also interested in the answers to David’s questions and have one of my own that likely wasn’t covered. I have solar panels set up on my roof and an extra circuit breaker panel for it. I’m wondering if one device would cover my home and panel set up or if I would need two?

  • Member

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    Thank you for the workshop, great info. I probably will get a device for my house and truck- is there a discount code? I thought that was mentioned but I did not see it. Some questions that I had were if I installed a home EMP shield what is the best way to protect devices not plugged into an outlet? I was looking up info on faraday cages but I wanted to build something a little nicer than a metal trash can with carboard lining it or a EMP bag that you can buy on Amazon- I doubt my wife would like the way that looks too much in the bedroom- plus I want something I can easily access. I want to protect a large and small solar generator/ inverter, some radios and other electronics. I was thinking to get some kind of storage chest- probably made of wood and line it with heavy foil and/or faraday fabric and tape like TitanRF Faraday Fabric Kit Includes 44″W x 36″L TitanRF Fabric + 36″L TitanRF Tape + Instructions. Military Grade Conductive Material Shields RF Signals (WiFi, Cell, Bluetooth, RFID, EMF Radiation).: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific but I was wondering if anyone has done or has guidance on that.

    I also have some solar panels but was wondering if I can just wrap the wiring with something like this TitanRF Faraday Tape – High-Shielding Conductive Adhesive Tape // Used to Connect TitanRF Fabric Sheets or Seal RF Enclosures (2.5in W x 10ft L): Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientifichttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07DVSTP9V/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_7?smid=A18CIY81ATLFKV&psc=1 or would the whole panel need to be protected.

    Finally on my truck one thing that sucks about the Tacoma that I have is that it needs a key fob to start the engine- there is not a way to manually start it with a key that I know of so I assume the key fob would need to be protected in some kind of faraday device. If anyone know of an alternate way to start it though I would like to know for a 2019 Tacoma.

    Thanks- Daron

  • TJ
    Member

    17 Replies

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    Finally had time to catch up on the workshop. Excellent presentation! I’m looking forward to the followup. I have two additional questions. I have a heavy duty steel gun safe and a thinner steel locking cabinet. Would either of those function as a faraday cage or would I need to modify them in some way? Also, it sounded like electric vehicles could not be protected from EMPs with current technologies? Our family vehicle is a hybrid SUV with a small lithium battery. Would the EMP Shield work on this vehicle?

    • Member

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      TJ – you don't mention if your heavy duty gun safe has an electronic lock or not. Wouldn't change the Faraday Cage properties of the safe itself, but might possibly present other concerns.

      • TJ
        Member

        17 Replies

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        Fortunately EMP concerns have been on my radar for quite some time. I went with a mechanical lock when I got the safe several years ago both for long term reliability and not wanting the electronic lock to fail and keep me out of the safe in case of an EMP. The only electronic safes I considered at that time were ones with a key backup.

        • Member

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          Sounds good. Don't forget that you're probably going to have to do something to plug up the hole that many gun safes have in them to provide electrical power for dehumidifiers (always something isn't it?)

          • TJ
            Member

            17 Replies

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            Thanks for bringing that up! I’m not using a plug but I suspect that hole is only plugged with a plastic piece. Would tinfoil or similar block it? Also the safe has a fire seal which probably keeps the door from sealing perfectly metal on metal. Would this slight opening present a problem?

  • TJ
    Member

    17 Replies

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    One more question that I just thought of. Accounts of the Carrington event talk of some telegraph offices catching on fire. Would a modern home be at risk of catching on fire during an EMP with all the wires running through the walls?

    • Member

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      Extremely unlikely given the electrical codes and UL specs governing wire jackets and installation specs. Telegraph wiring in the 1800's wasn't built/installed to anywhere near current day standards. Of course there's always the “one off – rat/mouse chewed” circumstance that's just waiting for the right set of circumstances to converge and create a fire!

  • Member

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    Not presenting myself as an authoritative expert, but while tinfoil might work, I would cover the hole with something more solid – say a small square of copper taken from roof flashing material – and then cover that with several pieces of metal foil tape (you could also do that on the interior side just to be sure). I'm not sure if the door seal on gun safes (product which is designed to expand with heat and “pressure seal” the door opening is electrically conductive or not (I suspect not as that I've examined has a rubberized outer jacket). I believe it's possible that you'll have to make a choice whether your safe will primarily seal from heat, fire (and potentially water incursion) or primarily shield from EMP energies. I'm thinking that one possible alternative might be to use a metallic thread EMP shielding fabric as a “cover sheet” over the front of the gun safe, having it held in place by magnetic strips around the entire outer perimeter – thus covering the gap between the door and the body of the safe, but still readily allowing for access with a complex repacking requirement. Nice thing about having a combination gun safe/Faraday Cage would be that any electronic optics installed on your guns would be protected from possible EMP damages. I'd add this question to the list for follow up with Andrew for his thoughts/insights.

    Added thought – you need to make sure that interior of the safe (especially the thin-wall locker styles) isn't electrically in contact with objects you're protecting (i.e. wood or cardboard linings probably best).

  • TJ
    Member

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    All good thoughts David. My safe is lined with some type of heat resistant material, maybe gypsum or similar covered in thin carpeting. My couple of electronic devices in it are all on wooden shelves. I also have an old metal gun cabinet that has no openings aside from where the door and body meet. I have one of those multi band radios and some Motorola handhelds in a cardboard box in it. Wonder how thin of a crack the pulse can reach in to?

    We are actually set up pretty well to live without electricity as long as the house doesn’t burn down. Though I’m really worried about wandering hoards of people panicking when they can’t access Facebook, etc. So would be nice to turn on a radio and keep up with how the rest of the world is reacting to an event.

  • Member

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    EMP energy can penetrate even small gaps (use the equivalent mental image of water flowing). So gaps will need to be covered/plugged, and redundant multi-layered protection will be an important consideration (i.e. sealed boxes within sealed boxes). Andrew also mentioned in the discussion that multiple attack waves are a reasonable expectation, so your use protocols are an equally important consideration (back to survival basics mantra of “two is one and one is none”. You can't assume it's a one event, then you're good to haul out all your gear. Best advice is likely to have a least 2 sets of needed equipment, holding one in unopened reserve.

    Even with HAM radio, unless you're sure who you're talking to, any communications you'd hear after a major event would sound suspiciously like “Everthing is FINE, no need to WORRY – STAY IN YOUR HOME – HELP is on the way!” A very good reason to building and maintaining HAM radio contacts not only in your local community but around the country. Thankfully, the current Administration has (just in the nick of time) seen fit to start charging for all the required FCC license testing where it used to be free.

    Regarding wandering people, don't forget that you'll need blackout curtains if your home manages to remain even semi-powered (via generator, batteries/solar, inverters). Imagine how any cooked food would smell if you hadn't eaten in days or weeks (that's still true even with smoke from wood fires). Given all the issues, unofficial Govt projected 90% U.S. death rate within the first year may be overly conservative!

    • TJ
      Member

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      I believe the US government used to keep food reserves expected to feed the entire US population for 18 months. Given that they sold off the last of those reserves in 2008 except for some butter and cheese, and given the average household and grocery store only has 3 days of food on hand, I think that 90% death rate in a grid down situation will be fairly accurate. Once you get to that few people the government and corporate elites will likely start caring about the need to keep some of us alive to scrub their toilets and fight their wars.

      Life was actually pretty good for the lucky ones who survived the Black Death years. Lots of land and resources available.. And with a very limited available labor force the people began to have more say in how they wanted to live their lives. Though the potential rebound from a grid down disaster could be severely impacted if the response to a HEMP or grid destroying cyber attack leads to WW3. I’m not sure I would want to live through a nuclear winter even if I had the incredible amount of resources needed to do it.

  • Member

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    Am I correct in assuming an EMP would be fatal to a person with a pacemaker or defibrillator installed on their heart?

  • Member

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    I saw in a YouTube install video that said I need a 2 pole 20 amp breaker but my panel just has single pole 20 amp breakers. The two poles breakers are 30 plus. Just wondering if the device can tie into one of these other breakers or how I can work around it.

  • Administrator

    17 Replies

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    According to this article…

    https://havokjournal.com/national-security/emps-dont-work-like/

    …People who rely on electronic devices to survive, like pacemakers, respirators, and life support systems, are very much vulnerable. The piece points out that EMP isn't necessarily a death sentence, but if you have a pacemaker in your chest, you might want to see if it's possible to make a Faraday cage out of your bedroom…

    https://www.bugoutbagbuilder.com/blog/how-make-your-own-faraday-cage-home

    The good news is, you CAN shield an entire room as long as there are no breaks or penetrations for the radiation to come through.

  • Member

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    O.K. Fellow Warriors – here's a very recently made insider's view of the countdown clock to the next big potential Carrington-like Event. This is science, not science fiction. It has happened, and it will happen again!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85-p9EIEVUA

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