Radio signal propagation

60 kHz to 600 mHz

Samuel J. Williams

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    Samuel J. Williams
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    60 kHz to 600 mHz

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    60 kHz is the long wave signal of the National Institute of Standards and Technology it is what self setting clocks use. The next common public frequency is 160 to 190 kHz 1/2 watt power limit you really have to be a geek to do this band. It might make a good neighborhood station if there isn't too much RFI. Radio frequency interference.

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    BBC 4 in England broadcasts on 198 kHz. Moving up is the old aircraft beacon band. I can't hear England I can hear Oklahoma city airport. The most famous antenna for this band was originally used by France, the Eiffel Tower 150 kHz.

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    Radio Rebelde 530 kHz depending on your distance to Cuba you maybe able to hear this station, at night. Also Canada reported in the NE. There are various clear channels on the rest of AM broadcast band. 160 meters or what is left of it is just higher in frequency than 1.7 mHz. One station is 1210 KGYN Guymon OK, 10,000 watts directional at night. I am familiar with their three tower end fire array. It is what inspired me to make a two element switchable mobile array for CB. It worked and SWR 1:1.1 on 19, not over 1:1.4 on the ends (ch1 and ch23 at that time.

  • TJ
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    My grandfather was a radio operator in the merchant marines during WWII so I have always had an interest in radio communications. Unfortunately he passed away before I was old enough to really tap into his knowledge

    I’ve been trying to get a couple of my neighbors interested in getting some inexpensive handheld units so we can communicate easily if the phones go down.

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    Yes, he would have used CW most likely. Morse code uses little bandwidth compared to voice meaning it can be filtered to a small band of frequencies drastically increasing signal to noise ratio. If anything gets through it is CW.

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    https://www.dxing.com/tuning.htmhttps://www.dxing.com/tuning.htm

    I have a scanner that covers 25mHz to 54mHz (VHF low) VHF high and UHF it doesn't have 220 mHz band.

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    I have a couple of those Baofeng radios that are all the rage among some survivalists… although the FCC licensing requirements have always confused me.

  • TJ
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    I’ve used some of the base model Baofengs for work. They worked very well in the open desert but the range drops significantly when you get in the canyons or down between the hills. The whole FRS, GMRS and related power limitations before needing a license is pretty confusing. My older radios listed in the instructions which channels you weren’t supposed to use without a license. Though I used to hear all sorts of people talking on those channels anyways. I think the newer consumer grade radios are required to not exceed the power limits that would kick you into needing a license.

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    The new FRS power limit is two watts no external antenna. The GMRS power limit is 50 watts external antenna is permitted. There are some simplex GMRS that only have 3 watts. If it says GMRS on the box it requires a license. Most channels are shared.

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    Yes you should have a license for Baofeng. Code is not required for the license, operating procedures and basic knowledge of electronic communication are. Check out the ham clubs in your area for license classes. Like law abiding gun owners the more licensed hams the better. So they should try to be affordable.

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    Shortwave broadcasters are reactivating broadcasts to Europe for the war in Ukraine. There maybe more stations audible everywhere. 25m, 31m, 41m, 49m, are the most likely with the continued low solar flux 60m, 75m, and 90m may also be used in Europe or late night from the Americas.

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    BBC broadcast to Ukraine. 15735 kHz should be 13:00 to 16:00 UTC. and 5875 kHz 19:00- 21:00 UTC. Not much chance to get them here. 15735 doesn't go far at night 5875 doesn't go far in daytime. International broadcasts are coordinated in UTC because they are often heard simultaneously in different time zones.

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    • TJ
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      I have seen some pretty impressive antennae arrays but never one two miles long!

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    Samuel,

    It seems like you have some background in radios. I got my ham license in 2020 and built an antenna that operates from 160m to 6m. and also have a few radios that operate on 2m and 70cm I have familiarized myself with some of the aspects of ham radio such that i will be comfortable communicating should it be the only means working. I’d love to help anyone who might be interested in learning more about it.

    Jacob

    K5JAD

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