Prepping Your Bug-Out Vehicle

Imagine the worst thunderstorm you've been through and then jack it up on steroids.

200 mph winds ripping your roof off… trees ripped from the ground and spread all over the ground of your neighborhood… roads blocked with water and drowned cars that tried to make it out in time…

As Hurricane Patricia batters the West and the South (we're bracing for even MORE flooding in my little Texas town!), it's time to do a check-in to see where you're at…

I mean, you've heard me talk about why you MUST have a bug-out bag.When crisis hits, you don’t want to be one of the local knuckleheads caught flat footed without food, water, protection, and survival tools. But is slapping a pack on your back and heading out the front door really the best way to evacuate when you're forced to get out of Dodge? Of course not.

But Is Your Bug-Out Vehicle Prepped And Ready For Evacuating From A Disaster?

Bug Out Vehicle Prepping

1. Specific To Your Environment

A bug-out “vehicle” is ANY mode of transportation you can use in case of an emergency. A car, a motorcycle, even a boat could be a bug-out vehicle if you live on the water. (Heck, I know one guy whose bug-out mode of transport is his horse.  Seriously.) Whatever you have, it should be able to navigate the terrain around your home, so if you live up in the mountains or on dirt roads, that truck isn’t a bad idea. The important thing to consider is that roads are the LEAST trustworthy route to get you to your “Plan B Safe Zone”. Do you have transportation able to go “off-road” if roads are blocked? Now you don't need a monster 4×4 monster truck or Mad Max “battle tank” to get you out of harm's way, but you DO need to have a backup plan. More on that in a minute…

2. “Invisible”

Sometimes the most important quality your bug-out vehicle can have isn’t horsepower or sheer force. It's stealth. I've seen desperate people in desperate situations and no matter the crisis, I always like to lay low so I don't stand out as a life-preserver for someone to grab onto as they're going down. I'll help where I can… but I don't want a mob of people coming up to me en route and in parking lots begging for help when I'm trying to protect my family. You want an older-looking car or another vehicle that draws no attention to you. It should be similar to other vehicles in your area so, if you live in a big city, a nondescript car is the way to go. If you need to go on major highways and you might need to pass checkpoints. You want your vehicle to look as un-interesting as possible.

3. “Layered” Transitional Bug-Out Strategy

Your vehicle is your biggest asset when you're evacuating… but it's also your weakest link that could throw you to the wolves. That's why it floors me that very few people are prepared to leave their bug-out vehicle behind if necessary. There are any number of reasons you might need to do this… You might get stopped… you might run out of gas… you might see that there’s a checkpoint ahead where they’re searching every car thoroughly… you might hit completely stopped traffic that makes it clear there’s no way out. Both your transportation AND your survival gear need to be able to keep you going even when your vehicle isn't. For example, when your primary vehicle (Phase 2) fails, do you have a “backup” ready to go as an alternate (Phase 3)? There are actually 7 “layers” of gear I talk about in my free survival gear guidethat shows you how to plan for this.

When you follow this type of “planned redundancy”, you can quickly transition from one Phase 1 to Phase 5 with ease while others are trapped in the chaos.

I can't stress enough how important this is and yet I see even “expert” survivalists failing to follow this methodology.

I learned it in the military and in my personal disaster experience, but you shouldn't need to go through combat or survive a hurricane to learn that lesson.

The important thing to do is take action NOW and look at your vehicle… your survival gear… your routes… your plan.

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