Machete Fighting: A Reader “Mind Tricks” A ROAD RAGER

Machete Fight Jedi Mind Trick

“All I could think, Jeff,” a reader said to me, “was what if it didn't work?”

That was the amazing opening line of an email I received not long ago from a reader who has trained in our Combat Machete program.

He lives in a state where he can't easily get a handgun… so his machete is his go-to defensive tool, and he carries it in his car.

Well, when a road-raging driver followed him into a parking lot, he knew that machete was the only thing that stood between him and getting beaten or even murdered.

But, knowing that a deadly fight might land him in jail, he tried one, desperate “Jedi mind trick” move first…

How To Avoid A Machete Fight… With MIND CONTROL?

How To Avoid A Machete Fight… With MIND CONTROL?

Machete Fight Jedi Mind Trick
Machete Fight Jedi Mind Trick
Now, I'm a big fan of defusing a fight before it happens, if you can.

I mean, that just makes common sense, right?

But my reader, Bill – who has followed MCS for a long time – also believes in being prepared for any threat.

That's why he had one of our MCS Guardian machetes in his car, and that's why he's trained to use it.

But he knows – just like you and I do – that if you do have to use potentially lethal force, you may have to go to court to prove that what you did was justified.

That's just a fact of our legal system.

So when he was on the highway, driving to his “essential job,” he wasn't looking for trouble with the driver who was speeding and pacing him.

When that road-raging driver followed Bill off the highway and into a parking lot, Bill knew he was in trouble – and he had forgotten his phone when he left the house, so he couldn't dial 911.

“I knew I shouldn't get out of the car,” he wrote to me. “If I did, he might do so too, and then I might need my machete if I thought he was really trying to hurt or kill me. I could see from his shoulders he was a lot bigger than me, a real ‘roided up monster. So I was stuck between a rock and a hard place.”

Bill tried to leave, only to have the driver cut him off.

That's when a moment of inspiration struck him:

“I rolled down my window and he rolled down his. He opened his mouth to say something angry… and I shot him a thumbs up and a HUGE grin, and shouted, ‘GREAT RACE!'

Bill said the look on the other guy's face was priceless.

The rager shouted, “What?” and Bill again, with even more cheerfulness, said, “GREAT RACE!”

“You… you didn't want to fight?” he said the road-rager asked.

Bill laughed like that was the most absurd thing he had ever heard, shook his head, and told the rager that he was a great driver and his car (a Dodge Charger) was super-hot.

“He actually looked confused,” Bill said, finishing his story. “He drove off without saying anything else… and thank goodness he did, because the whole time, I had my other hand out of sight on the grip of my machete, just in case he came at me.”

I had a really good laugh at Bill's story, although it's a pretty serious one.

He understood that in a fight against someone who is genuinely trying to hurt or kill you, when you've done everything you can to avoid it, a weapon might be your only option… and there isn't one much better than a machete if you can't have a gun.

But he ALSO understood that there might be a way to short-circuit this road-rager's train of thought… and by some stroke of luck, it totally worked.

And, finally, Bill knew that if it didn't work, he was going to have to be able to protect himself… which is why he took the time to get trained to use his blade.

He told me, in a follow-up email, that he also has “The Club,” one of those steering wheel lock bars, in his car, and he knew he could use the same techniques to wield that weapon like… well, a club.

That's exactly why I created my combat machete training DVD.

The next time some rage-fiend is trying to get in your face to hurt you or even kill you, waving your hand and telling him “These aren't the droids you're looking for” probably ISN'T an option.

When that's the case, you need these fighting principles – principles of “big blade and club” combat (which anyone can master in just 7 days).

Once you develop them, those skills will ALWAYS be there, ready to defend you with whatever weapon you have in your hands – from a machete, to a tire iron, to a stick… ANYTHING.

Just watch the DVD and you'll see what I mean.

But, hey, if you CAN use The Force, who am I to say otherwise?

What Weapons Do You Use To Defend Yourself When You're On The Road… Or At Home?

Please Share Your Best Survival Weapons Tips Below Now…

Best Tactical Tomahawk: 3 Things To Look For When Buying One

Best Tactical Tomahawk Reviews / Shopping Tips

Jeff Anderson

Tactical tomahawks have received a lot of recognition lately, and not just from the wannabe zombie hunters out there.

In today’s tactical landscape, these weapons are being adopted into the arsenals of law enforcement, rescue personnel, and even active duty military.

This begs the question: Which one do you buy?

Recently, I talked tomahawk shopping with the American Tomahawk Company's Eric Fehrman.

Here's a summary of what he told me.

3 Things To Look For In A Tactical Tomahawk

Best Tactical Tomahawk Reviews / Shopping Tips
Best Tactical Tomahawk Reviews / Shopping Tips
Eric Fehrman

The fireman’s axe was long a staple of rescue equipment, and for obvious reasons: It provided leverage and allowed rescuers to make their way through obstacles.

The tomahawk does this as well, while also giving first responders and other emergency personnel a very effective means of defending themselves.

The versatility,  the effectiveness of the tomahawk as both a tool and a weapon, has made it a valuable piece of equipment worthy of a closer inspection for anyone who’s serious about survival in a multitude of scenarios.

Tomahawks are everywhere now:  in catalogs, on every knife website, on social media (where companies do giveaways and promotions) and at gun shows.

(They’re even easily found in sporting goods stores now.)

With all these options, however, there are certain features that you should consider when you purchase a tomahawk to add to your arsenal of survival tools and weapons.

That's because all tomahawks are NOT created equal.

Consider the following, then, when you're shopping.

1. Buy A Trusted Brand

The first thing you should look for in a ‘hawk is a trusted brand, a manufacturer who is well known and has a good reputation.

Because of the rise in popularity of the tomahawk, cheap knockoffs and junk made anonymously somewhere in China is all over the market.

(A lot of the cheap tomahawks look and feel like junk because that is what they are.)

They are cheaply made and will break easily. Many have substandard sheaths, too.

If either the tool or its carry system breaks when you need it most, you are trusting your life to a piece of cheap garbage.

Avoid the no-name brands and go with a tomahawk that comes from an established manufacturer known for its quality.

2. Make Sure It Offers Good Utility

Don’t select a ‘hawk simply because it “looks cool” or even because it looks especially intimidating.

Tomahawks are intimidating and wicked looking pieces of gear, yes, but there are a lot of “fantasy” tomahawks on the market that look scary.

They’re full of strange curves, spikes, and other details that serve no real value other than to make them look fierce.

Chances are a tomahawk like this will break when you need it most, no matter how “bad” it looks.

Don’t buy something because it’s painted bright green and has the word “zombie” on it, either.

Instead, buy a tomahawk that is compact, lightweight, and has the features you believe will be most useful.

Another thing that people often overlook when it comes to ‘hawks is the sheath.

(Some manufacturers offer really terrible “sheaths” with their tactical tomahawks, flimsy pieces of nylon that are really just blade covers.)

Look for one that has a sheath that won’t fall apart soon after you start carrying it.

3. Look For A Strong Handle To Head Join

Most axe, hatchet, and tomahawk failures happen where the handle meets the head.

Look for a good ‘hawk that has a strong, sturdy joining of the head to the handle, so that you know it is a point of strength rather than weakness.

(Some synthetic handles offer better strength than wood.)

Test the head of the tomahawk to see if it shifts in your hand when you grip it and the handle and try to move the two.

Tomahawks are very useful tools.

Shopping for one requires that you pay attention to these details.

If you follow these guidelines, you will find a weapon that is right for you.

Do You Own A Tactical Tomahawk? What Features Matter Most To You?

Please Share Your Thoughts Below Now…