Point Shooting? 3 Times When You Absolutely MUST Master Aimed Fire To Survive An Attack!

Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson, Editor

I admit it. I talk a lot of trash about “aimed fire”.

Of course this gets me a lot of hate mail from the crusty, old, so-called “experts” out there who get their tighty-whiteys in a wad any time someone tries to slap some reality into how to train for real gunfights.

But actually, I have lot of respect for aimed fire…

…in the right circumstances!

I mean, the reality is, if you’re ambushed in a parking lot by some thug hiding behind a parked car, you’ll be lucky to even get to your gun, let alone ever use your front sight to get an “aim” on your target.

In these attacks, “point shooting” is all you’re gonna to be able to use.

But there are other very specific instances when your front sight is your best friend, and…

Here Are 3 Times When You Absolutely MUST Master “Aimed Fire” To Survive

Tactical Firearms Training: Aimed Fire Vs Point Shooting

Basically, the best time to use aimed fire instead of point shooting is when you’re not the person directly under threat.

Or… you have the time and distance to react to a threat before it’s on top of you!

Let me give you three potential scenarios where aimed fire is your best chance at survival…

1. Active Indiscriminate Shooter

You’re in a crowded area: a shopping mall, a schoolyard, a busy street.

You hear gunfire and screams, see people diving out of the way or dropping like flies.

You’re not in the immediate line of fire, and you have time to assess the threat and take the shooter out.

This is the time for aimed fire all the way.

It’s the only way to get that accurate distance shot you NEED to get the job done.

2. Mentally Ill/Homeless Threat

Right now, a vast array of homeless people are “off their meds.”

This means you could easily find yourself in a situation where a disturbed, armed “street person” is threatening you from a distance.

You should feel confident in drawing, giving strong commands to “Back off!” and use your aimed fire skills for all they’re worth if your life is ACTUALLY threatened.

(That’s not to say you should be roaming the streets looking for trouble from people who are down on their luck.)

It’s a fact, though, that these threats might require you to respond to a credible threat to your life.

When they do, you need to be accurate with your shots.

Especially when you’re out in public, you need to remember that you are responsible for EVERY round you fire.

3. Home Invasion Hostage

Your loved one has a gun to their head or a knife to their throat.

The attacker is threatening to kill them – and you believe they mean it.

This is probably THE situation all aimed-fire proponents train for.

Your wife or child’s life hangs in the balance of scumbag’s sadistic whim, and you have to take the shot.

Those are solid examples of true “aimed fire” scenarios – and I’m sure that there are more you can come up with.

But the real question isn’t whether this list is all-inclusive.

The real question is . . .

Are You Ready to Meet These Threats?

The reason I ask is because, while you can certainly get “marksmanship” training down at your local range, trying to get your 1” shot group inside that tiny circle on your paper target…

…These scenarios require REALISTIC training simulations where you’re facing either a live person or a 3-D target.

This is something I learned while conducting our stopping power analysis of over 6,000 real-world gunfights – and this is information YOU need so that you understand when aimed fire vs point shooting is appropriate.

That’s the only way you will survive a REAL gunfight.

What Are Your Thoughts On Aimed Fire Versus Point Shooting?

Please Share Your Thoughts And Experiences Below…

The Truth About “Point Shooting” vs. “Aimed Fire” (Front Sight Focus)

Point Shooting Vs. Aimed Fire

I admit it. I talk a lot of trash about “aimed fire”.

Of course this gets me a lot of hate mail from the crusty, old, so-called “experts” out there who get their tighty-whiteys in a wad any time someone tries to slap some reality into how to train for real gunfights.

But actually, I have lot of respect for aimed fire…

…in the right circumstances!

I mean, the reality is, if you’re ambushed in a parking lot by some thug hiding behind a parked car, you’ll be lucky to even get to your gun, let alone ever use your front sight to get an “aim” on your target.

In these attacks, “point shooting” is all you’re gonna to be able to use.

But there are other very specific instances when your front sight is your best friend, and…

Here Are 3 Times When You Absolutely MUST Master “Aimed Fire” To Survive

Point Shooting Vs. Aimed Fire
Point Shooting Or Aimed Fire (Front Sight Focus)?

Basically, the best time to use aimed fire instead of point shooting is when you’re not the person directly under threat.

Or… you have the time and distance to react to a threat before it’s on top of you

Let me give you a few potential scenarios where aimed fire is your best chance at survival…

1. Active Indiscriminate Shooter

You’re in a crowded area:  a shopping mall, a schoolyard, a busy street.

You hear gunfire and screams, see people diving out of the way or dropping like flies.

You’re not in the immediate line of fire, and you have time to assess the threat and take the shooter out.

Aimed fire all the way baby!

2. Mentally Ill/Homeless Threat

Right now, a vast array of homeless people are “off their meds,” which means you could easily find yourself in a situation where a mumbling, armed vagrant is threating you from a distance.

You should feel confident in drawing, giving strong commands to “Back off!” and use your aimed fire skills for all they’re worth if your life is threatened.

3. Home Invasion Hostage

Your loved one has a gun to their head or a knife to their throat.

The attacker is threatening to kill them – and you believe they mean it.

This is probably THE situation all aimed-fire proponents train for.

Your wife or child’s life hangs in the balance of scumbag’s sadistic whim, and you have to take the shot.

Those are solid examples of true “aimed fire” scenarios – and I’m sure that there are more you can come up with.

But the real question isn’t whether this list is all-inclusive. The real question is . . .

Are You Ready to Meet These Threats?

The reason I ask is because, while you can certainly get “marksmanship” training down at your local range, trying to get your 1” shot group inside that tiny circle on your paper target…

These scenarios require realistic training simulations where you’re facing either a live person or a 3-D target.

With the right equipment, you can safely train these (and other) scenarios using simple, dirt-cheap dry-fire drills you can do at home.

Here are 67 simple “at home” drills to get you started… 

In fact, home-based dry-fire drills aren’t just way more realistic than any range training you’ve ever done… but they can also be a lot of fun because you’re putting yourself in a real-world scenario instead of just “target practice” you’re probably currently doing down at the range.

Try just one single drill and I promise you’ll be hooked!

Do You Train To Point Shoot? Or Do You Use A Front Sight Focus?

Please Share Your Thoughts And Training Tips Below. . .

Shooting Under Stress: 3 Ways To Prepare For A Close-Quarters Ambush

Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson, Editor

How do you practice your handgun, rifle, or shotgun?

Do you do it at the shooting range?

Most people do.

It’s a relaxing, recreational atmosphere where people punch holes in paper, trying to get the holes close together while hitting bulls-eyes..

That’s great for trigger time and marksmanship… but it leaves out a LOT of what you need to know to fire a gun when someone is trying to KILL you.

I talked with Garrett Machine about this recently, and here’s what he had to tell me about improving your gun handling under stress.

Three Tips To Prepare For A Close-Quarters Ambush

3 Tips For Shooting Your Way Out Of An Ambush
If You Don’t Do These 3 Things, You Could DIE In A Real Gunfight
Garrett Machine

Do you “enjoy” shooting?

You might like target shooting… but what about learning to fire a gun under threat?

Shooting becomes a whole different ballgame when a trainer says to you, “Okay, sprint 50 meters as fast as you can, do 10 burpees, then draw your gun from cover, hit this target as fast as you can, change magazines, hit a second target as fast as you can, and when it pops back up, shoot it again.”

When under stress, your shooting skills go to HELL.

Scenario-based firearms training addresses things like physical exertion (the closest way to simulate stress) and rapid fire to center of mass.

Adding in these layers of complexity catapults the shooter much closer to the conditions he or she will face in reality.

It also reveals, very quickly, the need to have hand-to-hand training to back you up when you are clearing your home with a weapon.

Here are three things to keep in mind when shooting under the stress of a real attack, when somebody ambushes you at close quarters.

1. Weapons And Empty Hands Are Both Necessary

Shooting or hand-to-hand skills alone are not enough; you must have both.

Too many shooters just buy a gun and think they’ve got self-defense covered.

Some of these shooters even train in lots of different armed self-defense methods, including force on force scenarios, so they think they’re well prepared.

If you’re not actually training to fight WITHOUT a weapon, though, you’re leaving dangerous gaps in your training.

How can you possibly shoot under the stress of a real altercation if you have to first fight off an ambush attack to draw your gun in the first place?

Integrating empty hand fighting with armed self-defense is therefore absolutely critical.

2. You Had Better Work On Your Physical Fitness

You also need to work on your physical fitness.

You can’t afford to be out of shape and still consider yourself prepared for a real-life altercation.

How can you shoot and run and fight off an attacker if you don’t have cardiovascular conditioning and muscular strength?

The hand-to-hand training is arguably the more important of the two simply because you cannot be focused on the weapon.

The pistol, the rifle, the shotgun… these are just tools.

The real weapon is YOU, and you must excel at using whatever is at hand.

That means you can’t afford to “gas out” and be completely out of breath when your family needs you, or when somebody is on top of you beating your brains out.

3. Drill Constantly

Training is perishable.

That means that the longer you don’t practice, the more “rusty” you become.

You should always be training and drilling to keep your level of skill up.

Here’s a simple exercise you can do.

  1. Stand somebody in front of a door.
  2. Give them an airsoft gun or some other firearm simulator.
  3. Put the gun in a holster and just stand in front of that door.
  4. Then tell them you want them simply to react when the door opens.
  5. Maybe the first time the door opens, somebody is standing there with a rubber knife, and the second the door opens, they try to stab the defender.

Now in that scenario, if you try to go for your gun, you WILL be “killed” before your gun can clear its holster.

On the other hand, if you block and strike, take them down with hand-to-hand skills, THEN draw your weapon, you have a much better chance of controlling the situation.

See what I mean?

It’s all about challenging yourself and constantly improving your skills, under realistic stress.

That way, when it happens for real, you’ll be prepared to face it.

Do You Train To Fight To Your Gun? Could You Fight Off An Ambush To Do It?

Please Share Your Thoughts And Experiences Below…