Car Survival: 3 Tips For When You’re On Your Own, MAD MAX Style

I don’t know if you’re one of the follks who ventured out during the lockdowns and quarantines

But if you were, you may have noticed something:

It was practically “MAD MAX” on the highways!

Because there was so much less traffic on the roads, and because police were busy elsewhere (and possibly short-staffed), it was like there was no law on the roads.

The result?

Everybody was tearing around like it was fury road” out there!

And all that got me to thinking.

It isn’t just during pandemics, with normal services suspended, that you might be stranded on the road.

No matter when you drive, you need to follow…

3 Rules In Case You Find Yourself ON YOUR OWN On The Highway

3 Rules In Case You Find Yourself ON YOUR OWN On The Highway


If you have a break-down or even just blow a tire, you could find yourself stranded with no help.

Sometimes that’s because, like during the pandemic, normal services (such as Triple A and towing) are strained and unavailable.

Other times, it’s because you’re very literally in “the middle of nowhere” (and given the time I spend in rural Texas, I know what it’s like to be on your own when you break down).

The thing is, there are 3 rules every driver should be following… and way too many of us BREAK these rules.

If you just follow the rules, you’ll be a lot more prepared if you ever DO have a break-down and discover that help is a long way off.

(They’re SIMPLE rules, too… but you would be amazed how many people don’t follow them.)

1. Never Leave Your Car Below 1/2 A Tank

Gas makes the difference between getting where you want to go if you can’t find a station…

…and rolling to a stop while the engine sputters on fumes.

If you’ve ever run out of gas, you know how stupid it makes you feel.

But chances are pretty good that if you HAVE run out of gas, it’s because you gambled that you could go just a little longer before you filled up again.

Instead of gambling with your car’s range, always stop and get gas when the gauge goes under the half-tank mark.

That way, no matter what you’re doing, you’ll have plenty of extra gas to get there – and you’ll have an “early warning” of half a tank when you start looking for a station.

2. Check Your Spare And Jack

Most cars have just a feeble “spare tire” donut, these days.

Because tires are pretty good, it’s not uncommon for a driver to own a car for several years before getting a flat.

When that finally does happen, you might find that your donut isn’t properly inflated – or, worse, your jack doesn’t work.

(That happened to one of my employees, who discovered BOTH the jack AND the donut spare on a used car were no good… after he blew a tire on a dark, deserted highway.)

Even on a brand new car, check the jack and the spare periodically to make sure they both work.

You’ll be glad you did if you do blow a tire.

3. Have A Way To Keep Your Phone Charged

Murphy’s Law says that if anything can go wrong, it will, and at the worst possible time.

Wireless phones are better than ever these days… but they all suck power like crazy.

That means a phone that is 100% charged when you wake up could be hovering around 50% by noon (or worse).

Murphy’s Law says that if you do break down and need to call for a tow (or other help), your phone will be close to dead…

…And your regular charger is probably back home, where it does you no good at all!

There are lots of devices on the market that let you keep your phone charged up, including battery packs and other devices.

(Some even have built-in flashlights and other safety gear.)

Pick one, and make sure you test it before you put it in your car.

You’ll be grateful to have it when you need it.

(The flashlight option is especially important at night.)

Follow these three basic guidelines and you’ll be a lot safer on the road – even now, when it’s “anything goes” out there.

What’s Gear Do You Carry In Your Car?

Please Share Your Tips Below Now…